What are Anglo-Saxon countries?

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Anglo-Saxon countries are the English-speaking countries such as the United Kingdom, United States of America among others. 

The area which is now known as England was once made up of Anglo Saxon kingdoms. 

The French now use that term Anglo-Saxon countries to refer to all English speaking countries because the language developed from Anglo Saxon. 

What do I mean here, Anglo Saxon is the old English which gave birth to the modern English as we know it today. 

It is estimated that English is spoken by 470 million people around the world and 57 countries use it as an official language. These are the Anglo-Saxon countries we are talking about.  

At least 21 countries in Africa use English as an official language. In these Anglo-Saxon countries English is spoken by majority of the citizens. 

English gained its current influence because the British colonizers decided to spread the language to all the countries which they colonized. That is how we ended up speaking and writing in English. 

Anglo Saxon is no longer spoken in the modern world. It is a dead language now. 

Historians state that Anglo Saxon was derived from three  Germanic tribes: Jutes, Anglos and Saxons who spoke Frisian language.  These tribes entered Britain after the fall of the Roman Empire. 

In Africa, English is spoken in Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa, Uganda, Botswana, Lesotho, Mauritius, Rwanda, Swaziland, Liberia, South Sudan, Tanzania, Sudan, Zimbabwe, Zambia, Ghana, Malawi, Cameroon, Mauritius, Seychelles and Sierra Leone. These are the Anglo-Saxon countries in Africa. 

 

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Editor-in-Chief

Geoffrey Kerosi, B. Econ & Statistics, MPPA is a prolific Kenyan writer based in Nairobi City. Email: info@kerosi.com. Whatsapp: +254713 639 776 YouTube: Kerosi TV

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